Steve shares his knowledge, experience, and wisdom to help better equip and empower your capacity to mount a robust and effective response to a serious challenge.

steveHOLMES

2 brothers diagnosed with the same aggressive terminal cancer and 6 months to live. 

“Steve survived, but Graeme did not. Steve’s survival became a modern-day medical breakthrough that provided a new doorway to how patients can better respond and survive a serious cancer diagnosis.”

Surviving stage 4 metastatic and terminal cancer is remarkable in itself, it attracts attention, and therein lays a new unexpected responsibility.

Cancer patients suffer a lot, that’s what it is to be a patient, so anything that I can do to alleviate that suffering is a good thing, a positive thing, a meaningful thing. Sharing my story, knowledge, experiences, and wisdom in the best way possible does exactly that, it helps make other patient’s lives more liveable and shines a light on what is possible.

cancer READY

I find a lot of patient suffering comes from not understanding things and the confusion and overwhelm that comes from that. So helping people understand their diagnosis and options is a good start to improving their survival chances.

I have also learned the advantages of becoming cancer-ready, just as CPR awareness and basic knowledge can improve survival rates.

steveHOLMES

2 brothers diagnosed with the same aggressive terminal cancer and 6 months to live. 

“Steve survived, but Graeme did not. Steve’s survival became part of a modern-day medical breakthrough, providing a new pathway for how patients can better respond to and survive a serious cancer diagnosis.”

Surviving stage 4 metastatic and terminal cancer is remarkable in itself, it attracts attention, and therein lays a new unexpected responsibility.

Cancer patients suffer a lot, that’s what it is to be a patient, so anything that I can do to alleviate that suffering is a good thing, a positive thing, a meaningful thing. Sharing my story, knowledge, experiences, and wisdom in the best way possible does exactly that, it helps make other patient’s lives more liveable and shines a light on what is possible.

cancerREADY

I find a lot of patient suffering comes from not understanding things and the confusion and overwhelm that comes from that. So helping people understand their diagnosis and options is a good start to improving their survival chances.

I have also learned the advantages of becoming cancer-ready, just as CPR awareness and basic knowledge can improve survival rates.

I am currently cycling the equivalent of Australia’s coastline for Cholangio Warriors: Funding Patient Navigator Journals. Imagine pedaling the entire coastline of Australia – that’s 14,000 kms. Ouch! It’s a challenging journey, but one with a purpose far greater than the distance.

When Responding to Cancer, we must act with bold deliberation and persistent creativity, be open-minded, and act with unrestricted willingness. These are the attributes that drive the perseverance and endurance needed to flip cancer on its head and break its grip.

We all have the ‘Inner Will’ and ‘Freedom’ to choose these innate attributes at any moment; it is up to us—it is an indisputable right that only we can relinquish.

Cancer arrives wrapped in reputation – We can not control that we have cancer but we can control how we look at it – we can look through its reputational wrapping to see it as it is, not as we fear it is. We can perform a mental flip to see deep into its underside, its weakness, and our opportunity. It is then that we are ready to act and to respond on our terms.

As a patient, we must look to become part of the solution not just a passenger. We must help those who help us, we must lead them with our responsibility.

It matters not that you are a naive patient or a skilled experienced medical professional, it is the same.

Who I am 

One moment I was fit healthy and cycling, and the next, I am battling terminal cancer. A routine Saturday morning coffee ride turned into a fight for my life when I was diagnosed with Cholangiocarcinoma, and given just six months to live.

As it transpired my passion for cycling carved out a path through decisions and connections that ultimately saved my life. I endured 25 hours of multi-organ surgeries, including a major aneurysm, and 2.5 years of intense drug infusions. A last-minute ‘Hail Mary’ pass from my oncologist, Matthew Burge, involving a highly speculative experimental drug trial, Keynote 158, flipped my certain death on its head. Against all odds with no evidence or proof of success, I caught Matt’s pass, scored a touchdown, in just three days, and by the ninth week made history by achieving a ‘full and complete’ response—a feat never before achieved from such a late-stage, stage 4 Cholangiocarcinoma.

My unlikely survival became an unexpected responsibility. I was now in a profoundly unique position to better utilize and share what had been achieved and learned.

What I Do 

Architect and Creator: The Optimal Cancer Response – ‘The Process’: A methodical systematic approach that better equips and empowers a patient’s capacity to more effectively respond and survive an unexpected cancer diagnosis. This innovative approach in formalizing a patient-centric process to cancer response enables the patient to dismantle their cancer diagnoses into manageable pieces. This approach provides order, ensuring perceptions and actions are kept in sync, by focusing on the process rather than the outcome, thus removing harmful distractions and disempowerment.

The development of Cancer Patient Readiness (cancerCPR) principles: This initiative proactively prepares individuals and the wider community environments such as workplaces with a readiness process and compatible tools before it’s needed, aligning closely with the CPR Strategy and enhancing the successes seen in early detection initiatives.

‘cancerREADY Workplaces’ and ‘cancerREADY Community’: These initiatives expand and build upon “The Response Process,” serving the CPR strategy by actively shifting perceptions and changing the angle of attack from solely response methods to proactively building readiness processes ahead of its potential use. It also more directly addresses the rising trend in cancer diagnosis.

Founder and CEO Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation Australia: 

Claire and I founded and funded CCF Australia, a profoundly unique Patient-led Cancer, Genomic, and Advocacy Research solution. Our focus is on more fully utilizing today’s medical science for today’s patient toolkit and survival. Unlike traditional models, our mission diverges to more directly address the needs of today’s patient survival. This initiative and strategic positioning spearheads patient-led innovation, creating bridges between medical science, healthcare delivery, patient empowerment and response capabilities. Click here for a bullet-point overview of Cholangiocarcinoma.

A Graduating Moment: In a moment that felt akin to graduation, my oncologist, Matt, offered a few transformational words of wisdom: “There are many that we help a little and some we help a lot, and then there is you.” Go out there and ride your bike and do something special with the opportunity you have been given – see you in 3 months” –

The Essence of My Contribution: What I undertake today is the embodiment of that “something special” Matt highlighted. Contributing to the empowerment of others, offering them the tools and knowledge to face their battles, stands as the ultimate reward and purpose of my efforts – a heartfelt thank you to Matt.

Update: Significant Breakthrough

The future of CANCER

Empower the patient – Increase Survival: Empower their entire support community – Exponentially Increase Survival – Is that too simplistic? 

The Empowered Patient is uniquely positioned and equipped to engage with the latest medical and scientific advancements. Equipping patients with a structured process that integrates evidence-based best practices not only improves survival chances but adds to the success of early detection initiatives.

Guiding Thoughts

RealityCheck

HEALTHY PEOPLE GET CANCER TOO; We are all healthy until we are not.

None of us can predict when we might face a cancer diagnosis. Even healthy individuals, including doctors, nurses, and scientists, are not immune. That’s why being well-equipped with knowledge and resources (The Cancer CPR) becomes a crucial factor and advantage if we are ever unexpectedly diagnosed with a serious cancer.

Life, Science,and Certainty

There is nothing in life or the science of life that is not vulnerable to being knocked off its precarious pedestal of certainty. The only certainty in life is that there is no certainty, just obstacles and their possibilities. Therefore, the opportunity within life is to see the possibilities within the obstacles and then set about making them our reality.

It is our Choice

When you believe in cancer’s reputation more than you believe in your ability to respond and overcome it – which will triumph?

Changing the Angle of Attack

Shifting Perceptions: Changing the Angle of Attack

To succeed over cancer is to dismantle the diagnosis, to strip it of its reputational packaging, to see it as it really is, not as you fear it is. It is only then that you will be ready to effectively respond.
Follow the Process: The Process methodically breaks the cancer down into small, winnable pieces. It keeps you focused on conquering each step in front of you now – today, removing the disempowering distractions posed by the enormity of the challenge. One step seamlessly follows the next wearing down the cancer’s defences until they are no more – until cancer is no more.

Shifting Perceptions:

Seeing through the reputational packaging of cancer, peering past the packaging to its center to uncover its vulnerabilities and your opportunities and possibilities at its core. If you don’t look, you won’t see!”

I Have Cancer I Am Going to Die

A crucial distinction: “I Have Cancer” is an objective fact. In contrast, “I Am Going to Die” is very subjective, a borrowed opinion, not a fact. It does not factor in the capacity of a well ‘Equipped and Empowered Patient.’

When diagnosed, it’s critical to see a cancer diagnosis as it is, not as you fear it is; being diagnosed is just a position, not a fate. This clear view unleashes your courage to act on what’s controllable and accept what isn’t. That is when you’re truly ready to respond.

You must quickly move to accept the things you cannot change, have the courage to change the things you can control and change, and possess the wisdom to know the difference. You cannot control that you have cancer, but you can control how you will respond.

Shakespeare said, ‘Nothing is either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.’ Our perception and the stories we tell ourselves determine whether it’s a good story, a bad story, or no story at all.

I recall Theodore Roosevelt’s words, “We must all wear out or rust out.” I choose to wear out. This mindset powered my response when given just weeks to live.

All this is simple, but not easy. It takes practice, persistence, perseverance, and a disciplined focus that comes from taking full responsibility. We as patients must think differently, we must have creative persistence and we must hold our poise and grace – our nerve.

To repeat how I began this page: We must Act with Deliberation, Boldness, and Persistent Creativity: We all have the ‘Inner Will‘ and ‘Freedom‘ to choose these innate attributes at any moment, it is up to us – it is an indisputable right that only we can relinquish. ~ All the best, Steve

My Challenge

Separating the lessons learned from the emotions that encapsulated them has been a significant challenge. Initially, I sought to detach them for clearer communication. Yet, I realized that these emotions are not just carriers, but integral components of the lessons themselves. My challenge now lies in sharing these intertwined experiences in a way that offers tangible benefits

ContactME

For more information please contact me
Warm Regards Steve

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